Wednesday, October 31, 2007

Musings: Tricks and Treats

There was a definite nip in the breeze when I went out walking this morning, which is appropriate for Halloween. When I was a kid, I loved being out at night without my parents and collecting a big bag of candy. As an adult, I still get a thrill out of lighting the candle and seeking the jack ‘o lantern’s face illuminated. It wouldn’t be Halloween without the smell of burning pumpkin.

It seems appropriate that the House will vote today on the Superferry bailout bill, which has been dressed up, but barely disguised, as legislation to support a generic high speed ferry operation.

At least we were treated to Rep. Marcus Oshiro articulating the crux of the special session while questioning Gov. Lingle, as reported by the Star-Bulletin: “We are asking for special legislation for one project. Do you understand the enormity of what you are asking us to do?”

The trick will be keeping Lingle in check now that she’s gained tremendous political power by successfully convincing the Legislature to do her bidding on behalf of a corporation that so far has done a great job of tearing Hawaii apart.

That divisiveness will be the topic of discussion on Hawaii Public Radio’s “Town Square” program, airing from 5 to 6 on Thursday night. Sen. Gary Hooser will be a guest, along with Big Island journalist Hunter Bishop and me. Hunter’s blog has some interesting comments on the subject. No doubt about it, the Superferry controversy has opened the eyes of many to some of the less savory aspects of “lucky you live Hawaii.”

You can tune in at KIPO 98.3 FM or on line.

It’s a call in show, too — 1-877-941-3689 — so a good chance for Neighbor Islanders to share their thoughts with Oahu. Mahalo to Larry Geller for setting it up.

Another trick will be getting the Superferry into Nawiliwili Harbor without arrests, injuries, deaths — and more of that international bad publicity that worries Lingle and tourism officials — when the boat starts running again. Lingle is likely already prepping the costume she’ll don as the self-proclaimed head of the “Unified Command,” and Kauai folks are gearing up for the event with a totally legal “pre-protest” set for this Sunday.

Andrea Noelani Brower, who was among those in the water, keeping the ferry out of the harbor when it last came to visit on Aug. 27, sent out this email:

“Of course there will be massive
protest when the Superferry attempts to enter Kahalui
and Nawiliwili Harbors, but we need to voice our
outrage prior to its dreaded return.

How about a state-wide demonstration in protest of the
bill? Aunty Louise and Aunty Nani will lead a water
protest at Nawiliwili Harbor at 12:00 this Sunday.
Folks on Oahu, Maui and Hawai'i Island could plan
their own actions to take place simultaneously. Let's
send a loud and clear message to the Hawai'i
Superferry and corrupt politicians that we will not
back down--we still say A'OLE!!”


Superferry officials may think they scored all the treats in this special session, but from what I hear, opponents still have a few tricks up their sleeves.

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

Yes. Ironic that the vote is on Halloween. Nothing "hallowed" about it, but it's pretty scary.

gadfly said...

Q: What is a 2-word, 21-letter syn. for "xenophobia"?

From http://www.workingnet.com/thunderbear/260.html

"In addition to being Southern, Cumberland Island National Seashore is, after all, an island.

Island inhabitants are fiercely independent and fiercely defensive of their island, as Adolph Hitler discovered concerning England and we found it best to use the Atom bomb rather than invade the island nation of Japan, We have even coined a rather unkind word to describe islanders; "insular"

The insular possessiveness extends to virtually everyone who sets foot on Cumberland Island. This is my island, and by God, I have an opinion on how it is to be developed or not developed and my opinion shall prevail!

In addition to being Southern and an Island, Cumberland Island National Seashore had been private property. Private Property in present day America is sacrosanct. There is a suspicion (carefully watered and fertilized) that the "guvmint" (that is, you and I) has too much land and is somehow "locking it up," thus preventing your average unemployed street person from enjoying life as an owner of a golf course."

The sentiment sounds pretty "islandy" out here in the Pacific, too.

jkeliipio said...

Well, unfortunately, it doesn't look like Kona can catch that radio channel at that hour so I'll just look forward to hearing how the program went.
I find that there are a few self centered former continent dwellers out there who love to explain why islanders dislike their ways by calling it "xenophobic". They just don't get it, do they? I guess that's what self-centeredness does to some people.