Wednesday, February 10, 2010

Musings: Dispensing Treats

A late-rising thin sliver of white illuminated the dark whole of the moon in an eastern sky smudged coral-pink in anticipation of dawn when Koko and I went walking this morning.

We were headed toward clear-toppd Wailaleale, which was destined to flush lavender when the sun rose. I kept turning around to watch the smoldering color spread across the sky. Koko, however, kept turning around to watch for my neighbor Andy, whose pocket magically dispenses treats.

It’s not unlike the relationship between Hawaii Superferry and some members of the state House — most notably Joe Souki and Calvin Say — who have introduced a bill that would create a special fund to establish a state-subsidized ferry system using the Alakai and Huakai.

The bill directs the Ferry Authority to seek federal funding assistance and seek to buy or lease the two fast ferries, or other suitable vessels, so long as they can carry at least 400 passengers and travel at speeds of 30 knots or more, which really narrows the market.

HB 2667, which the House Transportation Committee approved on Monday, goes on to give the Authority full access to all waters of the state and “access on a priority basis into all harbors and small boat facilities operated by the department [of Transportation] and the department of land and natural resources for discharging and receiving of passengers and property, wharfage, mooring, terminal, and other support facilities” and says it shall, “to the extent practicable,” use the Hawaii super ferry’s terminal facilities, ramps, moorage facilities, and equipment.

Georgina Kawamura, director of the state Department of Budget and Finance, testified that any diversion from the General Fund “cannot be considered at this time” and noted:

It is unclear if the Hawaii State Ferry System special fund would be financially self-sustaining.

Yes, that was always the big question about Hawaii Superferry, too — not to mention all those other environmental issues.

Meanwhile, the two ferries may return to Hawaii, anyway, as the Joint High Speed Vessels they were designed and intended to be. But under this scenario, they would be subsidized by the feds, instead of the state. The Army is now preparing a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) to explore the potential impacts associated with stationing JHSVs at various ports, including Pearl Harbor.

And it does appear there will be some. According to the notice:

The JHSV will require fueling-at-sea training; aviation training (helicopter); live fire training; and high-speed, openwater-craft training.

29 comments:

Anonymous said...

Very, very cool. I hope to see them back in action soon in both military and civilian capacities.

Anonymous said...

Yes! better then sowing unburned jet fuel in the winds.

Anonymous said...

Souki and Say must go. They've both been in the House too long.

Anonymous said...

Great. The Superferry couldn't even get enough passengers when they were discounting their fares. Not that subsidizing a ferry system will be a problem, given the unlimited amount of money in our state coffers. Way to go, Calvin and Joe, fund this money sucking project instead of education.

Brad Parsons said...

Anon said, "...Way to go, Calvin and Joe, fund this money sucking project instead of education."

Oh yeah, that's a good one.

Maria said...

the return of "Frankenship". calvin and joe, what pair!

Anonymous said...

I don't believe in the Superferry any more than I believe in the toothfairy.

Anonymous said...

"Frankenship"

That perfectly captures the torches n pitchforks irrational mob mentality of the anti-superferry villagers all right.

Anonymous said...

"Frankenship" more aptly describes the loose affiliation of millionaires, billionaires, corrupt bureaucrats and administrators and spineless legislators that gave us the Superferry. How can the villagers oppose something with a catchy jingle and such beautifully crafted advertisements?

Infuriating Liberal said...

Wow, how uninformed can you people be? Are you not aware, that an identical Superferry Vessel, with the same company sunk suddenly in perfectly calm waters, with absolutely no adverse weather conditions in the Phillipines killing hundreds of passengers? Gee willikers, Beaver, ya mean it, honest? Wow !

Yes, Virginia, there is a Superferry. It sunk. In more ways than one.

Here is the link, bye the way, and there are hundreds of news articles worldwide describing the horrible incident.

The superferries in the Phillipines have been having problems for years, even being bombed by terrorists.

Philippine ferry carrying almost 1,000 capsizes, 9 dead, hundreds rescued

http://www.eturbonews.com/files/imagecache/fullpage/000rr_51.jpg

Thats a link to the "Superferry 9" just before it capsized and sunk

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2004_SuperFerry_14_bombing

The bombing killed 116 people on the Superferry 145. Same company, same boat people.

Its not a different company it is the same one. Questions about security and the stability of the ships build have been raised and are legitimate.

Now how can you argue with these facts and incidents involving the SF? You can't Other SF, same company in the Italian Riviera sliced whales clean in half.

The SF exception was found to be unconstitutional. More than likely extremely corrupt.

SO all of you dancing for joy? I am sure that the dead passengers of the SF 9, and 14 thank you for your sensitivity, not to mention the sliced in half whales.

Do to the fact that this SF sunk last year, the likelihood of any SF in Hawaii being used as a civilian passenger boat is negative zero.

Anonymous said...

whatta wingnut

"Now how can you argue with these facts and incidents involving the SF?"

-- aside from asking what the terrorist bombing relevancy is, i suppose by noting (for starters) that the boat 9 that sank was a single hull, not a double hull (as any photo could show)


VESSEL DETAILS:
1. Type: Passenger Cargo
2. Gross Tonnage: 7,268 GT
3. Net Tonnage : 2,468.04
4. Length Overall: 135 meters
5. Breadth: 23 meters
6. Depth: 7.4 meters
7. Hull: Steel
8. Number of Engine: 1
9. Engine: NKK 18 PC2-6V
10. Horse Power: 13,500
11. Year Built: 1986 by Usuki Iron Works , Ltd. in Japan
12. Year Converted: 1995 by Cimecor in Cebu City
13. Homeport: Manila
14. Former owner: William Lines Inc.
15. Present Owner/operator: Aboitiz Transport System Corp. (ATSC)
16. Classification Society: American Bureau of Shipping (ABS)

Source (Philippine Coast Guard incident report):

http://www.coastguard.gov.ph/News-Sept.htm#10


but yes, common carriers out there can be sloppy. garuda out of indonesia would be another example

otherwise "The SF exception was found to be unconstitutional [by a state supreme court in the habit of being overturned by higher courts ;)

anywho, get back on your meds


dwps

Anonymous said...

Linda Lingle just nominated the State's pro-superferry lawyer, Lisa Ginoza, to the Intermediate Court of Appeals. Ginoza involved in the illegal exemption, argued for HSf and against the environment, played dirty, supported unified command - in short, a political hack and not judge material. If there was ever a time for letter writing.

Anonymous said...

Wow, how uninformed can you people be? Are you not aware, that an identical Superferry Vessel, with the same company sunk suddenly in perfectly calm waters, with absolutely no adverse weather conditions in the Phillipines killing hundreds of passengers? Gee willikers, Beaver, ya mean it, honest? Wow !

This has to be by a pro superferry troll trying to discredit anti superferry people by making them look like complete idiots.

squid lover said...

It really is not hard to make Superferry supporters look like idiots.

Also if it walks like a duck, quacks like a duck, and looks like a duck, its a duck.

The point to the bombing incident, is that security was lax on the Superferry.

The polint of the SUperferry 9 sinking, was to show that the designs of the Superferry are not very seaworthy.

The point of mentioning the court case? Cannot dispute the fact that was the ruling.

That you do not agree with it is immaterial. If they had ruled in favor of the SF, you would have been crowing their praises!

Anonymous said...

The polint of the SUperferry 9 sinking, was to show that the designs of the Superferry are not very seaworthy.

Superferry 9 was built by Usuki Tekkosho of Saiki, Ōita, Japan, you squid, and its design looks nothing like the Astral designs. Seriously, you are a superferry supporter in disguise, aren't you. You're just trying to make superferry opponents look like nincompoops. Right?

Anonymous said...

I guess that big Superferry logo, that looks just like the SF logo on the one that was here was a rip off. According to dwps, somehow the Superferry had nothing to do with it.
I guess he/she forgot that the Superferry is always owned and operated by various private or government agencies, and their names show on the list, not Superferry.
It is either that, or someone out there in the Superferry world is ripping off the hallowed name of Superferry. I would get a copyright attorney on the phone right away. :)

scooper said...

Wow, a SF ripoff from Japan! Who would have thought!
Seriously, when SF vessels are commissioned they are commissioned to be built in various countries, not just by Astral Corp. Astral Corp just happened to get the contract for the ones that would operate in Hawaii.
Honestly how idiotic can you be? If its a Superferry, with the exact same logo, its a Superferry. Its not something else. A Superferry is a Superferry is a Superferry.

Superferry 2010 logo from the Phillipines.

Superferry Logo from Hawaii.

http://www.superferry.com.ph/news/news_view.asp?id=297

pic of SF Hawaii version
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/8240224.stm

Here is a video of the rescue.

http://www.alertnet.org/thenews/newsdesk/MAN52113.htm
A list of ferry accidents in the Phillipines

http://www.simplonpc.co.uk/Strintzis/Sea_Jet_2_01BF.jpg
Sea Jet2 Greek Islands, BUT here is the Superferry II, with the company name of Blue Ferries. You will notice the logo is the same, as was the same with Hawaii.
http://www.simplonpc.co.uk/TropicJPEGS/T339.jpg

http://www.latimes.com/media/thumbnails/photogallery/2007-06/30809542.jpg
Another pic of the Hawaii Superferry logo (Just look at the word, Superferry.) The logo on all three vessels is the same.

If a different type font, or writing was used, then the case may be that these are not all from the same source, ie, Superferry's as a company logo, but as a disassociated group from each other. Much like the word "bread" is used on all loaves of bread that are sold, but it does not mean they are all from the same company.

However, it is all the exact same font, the exact same logo, although different colors are used. I believe that is where the belief that the SF ferries are all part of one show.

I think the point being expressed here, really besides the fact of is the SF in the Phillipines, the same as the SF in Hawaii, or can anyone call a ferry a Superferry, or is there a license restriction or copyright on the use of the name Superferry, is that they are associated in the minds of people as being the same thing.

Accident rates with vessels being called "Superferries" worldwide seem to follow a pattern. There have been many incidents and accidents. and travel on them can be risky, and things have occurred.

I think the point may be that the way the SF was presented, it may not be as safe as originally led us to believe. Having traveled on the Hawaii SF and experienced the throwing up of hundreds of passengers during a rough sea even though pills were used and even the crew was throwing up may lead people to believe that the ads touted and the actual reality were two different thing.
For me, I see it as much better equipped to handle battle hardened marines and military, or maybe even used as a way to toughen them up. A few passes on the Hawaii SF in winter waters between Maui and Molokai should do the trick.
Thats my opinion anyways.

Dude, it was a Superferry. Get over it.

Anonymous said...

The SF discounted fares and it still couldn't get a decent passenger count. Even if it's seaworthy (which is questionable given all of the time that the boat spent in drydock being repaired), why sink money into a venture that has been a proven money loser?

perry said...

here is the Superferry incident in Indonesia, where dozens of people have died.

Yes, it was a vessel named "Superferry". It looks extremely similar to the SF that was in Hawaii.The vessel was overloaded, and ran in bad weather.

Sound familiar?

perry said...

http://www.splashvision.com/Video/26078_Deadly-Indonesian-Ferry-Accident.html

Anonymous said...

Scooper, you are quite the specimen. So, you would see no difference between an Airbus A380 and a Boeing 747 if they both said Northwest Airlines on the side. (Even if one Northwest Airline was the American company and the other was some company out of the Philippines). Wow. Your logic is fascinating and entertaining at least. I'll give you that.

pristine world said...

http://131.247.19.1/jpt/pdf/JPT%208-4S%20Lawson.pdf

Extremely interesting study. Might be worth time in reading it. I found it quite interesting.

About the Authors
Catherine T. Lawson (lawsonc@albany.edu) is an assistant professor in the
Department of Geography & Planning at the University at Albany in New York.
She received her master’s degrees in urban and regional planning and in applied
economics and her doctor’s degree in urban studies/regional science from Portland
State University in Oregon. Her research interests include water-related transport
(passenger and freight), travel behavior, and archived intelligent transportation
systems (ITS) data visualization.
Roberta E. Weisbrod (weisbrod@sustainableports.com) is the director of Partnership
for Sustainable Ports LLP, a business dedicated to improving the public and
private benefits of maritime transportation. Her research interests include waterrelated
transportation (passenger and freight), environmentally sound urban freight
transportation, and waterfront development. She was Director for Sustainable
Transportation at INFORM, an environmental organization; Director for Port and
Intermodal Planning at the New York City Economic Development Corporation;
and special assistant to the Commissioner for Harbor Environmental Issues at the
New York State Department of Environmental Conservation. She has a Ph.D. in
biochemistry from Cornell University Medical College. She is the cofounder with
Len Roueche of the Worldwide Ferry Safety Association.

scooper said...

Actually I would see a definite difference in them, anonymous.

If the logos were different. However, if the two planes, operating in different companies both said Northwest Airlines on them and had the same logos on them, same type font and look I would logically assume, as would many others that it was the same company operating both planes.

Consumerism and advertising. Go figure huh?

Anonymous said...

scooper says that two different airplanes made by two different companies are equally likely to fall out of the sky if the same airline brand is painted on their sides. Good thinking scoop! You have a mind like a steel trap.

Anonymous said...

"The point to the bombing incident, is that security was lax on the Superferry."

-- so 3rd world security on one common carrier translates into safety threats as to other carries in, say, scandinavia? c'mon..


"If they had ruled in favor of the SF, you would have been crowing their praises!"

-- actually i dont care that much about it, but thats probably right as to many others i would guess


look i sure aint no "ship" connoisseur...just the single vs double hull thing struck me as relevant (aside from different shipyards, engines, etc etc). mmk?


dwps

Anonymous said...

"Very, very cool. I hope to see them back in action soon in both military and civilian capacities."

Dick Cheney

"Frankenship"

"That perfectly captures the torches n pitchforks irrational mob mentality of the anti-superferry villagers all right."

Bob Awana

"otherwise "The SF exception was found to be unconstitutional [by a state supreme court in the habit of being overturned by higher courts ;)"

Roy Cohn

"look i sure aint no "ship" connoisseur...just the single vs double hull thing struck me as relevant (aside from different shipyards, engines, etc etc)."

Bennett Brauer

Brad Parsons said...

Hey, Joan, here's a knowledgeable guy who thinks the SeaFighter (FSF-1) would be more useful than the JHSV:

http://www.informationdissemination.net/2010/02/jhsvs-are-not-coastal-patrol-vessels.html

Anonymous said...

dwps said "anywho, get back on your meds"

Ever notice how this character dwps resorts to ad hominem attacks when logic fails him/her/it as it FREQUENTLY does. Oh no! now I'm infected as well! gotta go take my smart pills.

Anonymous said...

"irrational mob mentality"

Wrong! The correct term is smart crowds. People helping people are the most wonderful people in the world.