Friday, November 14, 2008

Look Familiar?

Here are photos that show Austal's JHSV, published in Marine Log. It notes:

The JHSV will have a 103 m catamaran hull (which is actually shorter than the 113 m Hawaii SuperFerry cats built by the yard) and a speed of more than 35 knots. A draft of 3.8 m will allow superior access to "austere" ports.


The second Superferry had these types of ramps installed.

19 comments:

Anonymous said...
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Anonymous said...
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Joan said...

It was deleted because I didn't like it, it was smart ass and I don't want to put that kind of energy out there.

Anonymous said...
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Anonymous said...

They look pretty hot to me. If we can get 2 of them and split useage and cost 60/40 military/civilian ferry transport, that would be great.

Anonymous said...

Did Katy turn off comments on her blog?

Anonymous said...

"Look Familiar?"

2) Of course it looks familiar; it's Austal's design. They've been making these since the
1990's; a decade before Superferry. Austal has pictures of over 30 fast ferries they've made. They all look like this. The design was proven years before the Navy leased one around 2002.

2) By routinely signing up for a common National Defense Naval listing, Superferry got someone else to pay for a solution to their Maui barge/ramp nightmare. Around here, that's known as a very good business decision, not proof of a deception hiding in perfectly good sight.

This is classic mountain/molehill.

Anonymous said...

write on joan!,.,.. peace, jt

Joan said...

"Did Katy turn off comments on her blog?"

Yes, for the same reason I turned moderation back on. Too much blathering.

Anonymous said...

Now Katy's stuff is mere monologue. Where's the fun in that?

MauiBrad said...

Check out the picture collage at:

http://hisuperferry.blogspot.com/2008/11/hsv-picture-collage.html

Aloha, Brad

Anonymous said...

> By routinely signing up for a common National Defense Naval listing, Superferry got someone else to pay for a solution to their Maui barge/ramp nightmare. Around here, that's known as a very good business decision, not proof of a deception hiding in perfectly good sight.

This is classic mountain/molehill. <


Actually, it's classic greed: lobbying one's personal politicians to get the taxpayers to pay for one's business costs, and pocketing the profit.

Anonymous said...

Anon 6:48,
What do you know about business?
What do you know about make things happen?
What do you know about being successful?

"Don't wait for the translation"
The answer is nothing.

Dismissing success as greed is the echo of a failure.

Anonymous said...

Looked at the pictures you're advertising Brad. You've got Incat's Trimaran posted several times. Incat and their design are Austal's competition. If this was intentional; I don't get it. If this was another example of what passes for research, then I do.

Anonymous said...

> Dismissing success as greed is the echo of a failure. <

Confusing elitist greed with sustainable growth is the failure of money mongers from HSF to Wall Street. It's the same gas trying to inflate the same bubble, stodgily unaware it has popped.

Anonymous said...

The bubble pops routinely; cyclically to be precise. It usually affects the failures a lot more than the capable.

Anonymous said...

If you rode the SF last week, you probably had a nice ride. If you rode it today, not so much. How do you increase volume if you can't guarantee the quality of the ride? Even if the economy wasn't tanking, the SF wouldn't make it.

Anonymous said...

if the SF does fail, i hope it is clear to all that it failed due to the general economy, and not to "hawaii/kauai being a tough business environment" or "kauai 'not liking' businesses"...as that is certainly NOT the message to be sending out when trying to diversify kauai's economy with new business generally and/or trying to persuade national and international sustainability firms to come here and set up exemplar demo operations

Anonymous said...

Yes, let's be very careful not to offend the corporations. They might take their business elsewhere.

One can only hope. As conservative columnist David Brooks wrote:

"...the biggest threat to a healthy economy is not the socialists of campaign lore. It’s C.E.O.’s. It’s politically powerful crony capitalists who use their influence to create a stagnant corporate welfare state."

Full text at http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/14/opinion/14brooks.html