Wednesday, November 12, 2008

Odds and Ends

The big moon, full tonight, kept the roosters up all till all hours, and howling dogs added to the chorus, so Koko and I were out in the neighborhood early this morning, which worked out well, anyway, as I’m off to Honolulu for work today.

But just wanted to share a few tidbits before I go.

First, it seems the State Historic Preservation Office on Kauai is closing, due to budget cuts, and the district archeologist position — held by Nancy McMahon before she was promoted to #2 in the division — has been frozen. So the state presence here will be minimal, at best.

Second, as Koohan “Camera” Paik is organizing parties to launch her book, “The Superferry Chronicles,” she’s already meeting with some resistance. Kimo Rosen is planning another “bring back da Superferry” demonstration at the first party — set for Dec. 3 at Hanapepe United Church of Christ — to protest the book. His protest is at 5 p.m., and the party starts at 6.

As he notes: “It obviously is a book against free enterprise and what is constitutional, since it is totally unconstitutional that the superferry was grounded and no other form of mass transit that pollutes was grounded, inclusive of Cruise ships, barges, freighters, yachts, airplanes, buses, cars and motorcycles.”

Umm, OK, Kimo, if you say so. Oh, and watch out for falling rocks.

Now as you may recall, Kimo’s last protest didn’t draw a sizable crowd, but when you’re promoting a book, I guess any publicity is good.

As for the Superferry, I think it’s pretty obvious that it ain’t comin’ back to Kauai. And that’s good news for our new voyaging canoe, the Namahoe, which may be able to take its space at the pier, making it easy for school groups and others to tour the canoe. I’d say that’s a far better use of harbor space.

And finally, I just couldn't resist directing you to this article, in which Bush proves he isn't a complete idiot by acknowledging a few of his regrets. Among them are the "Mission Accomplished" banner at a speech he gave back in March 2003, about a month after invading Iraq, and his "Wanted: Dead or Alive" reference to Osama bin Laden.

Oh, and don't forget this one:

He also said he regretted telling Iraqi insurgents in 2003: ``There are some who feel like that the conditions are such that they can attack us there. My answer is, bring 'em on.''

In the interview yesterday, he said, ``My wife reminded me that, `hey, as president of the United States, be careful what you say.'''


Obviously, however, he failed to listen to Laura.

14 comments:

Anonymous said...

Notice the sustainability mantra ends when it comes to shifting cargo and persons via a boat rather than planes.

Anonymous said...

"As for the Superferry, I think it’s pretty obvious that it ain’t comin’ back to Kauai."

What in the name of God gave you this idea? With political resistance (the resistance that really matters and isn't marginalized) fleeing to the very very qualified statement; with fuel prices dropping like a rock in water; with a second ship and an environmental assessment MOST people will accept on the horizon; why do you continue to cling to the Brad Parson's Fantasyland of wishful thinking that parades as a THEORY that the whole thing is a Military facade and will go away? Probably because you contributed to the THEORY (that's right THEORY THEORY THEORY THEORY THEORY). I'll be thinking of your THEORY as I'm riding with my truck to Oahu next year!!!!!!!!!

Anonymous said...

yikes, pete! get a life

Anonymous said...

who is pete?

Joan said...

What in the name of God gave you this idea?

That idea is based totally on HSF corporate actions. Even tho its second ferry is pau, HSF isn't bringing it to the islands for at least a year. Meanwhile, it's scaled back Maui operations slightly. It seems to me that if they were coming to Kauai, they'd be moving in that direction by now.

Anonymous said...

"It seems to me that if they were coming to Kauai, they'd be moving in that direction by now."

That seems pretty arbitrary. Fifty dollar a bbl oil was probably not part of the calculation when they decided to postpone service. They can always change their minds.

MauiBrad said...

Senator Shelby a Republican from Alabama put out a press release on the JHSV program yesterday at the following site: http://shelby.senate.gov/public

But the Navy still has not announced anything on it.

Although, the day before Shelby's press release the following article appeared in the Boston and London papers: http://www.iht.com/articles/2008/11/11/america/pentagon.php?WT.mc_id=glob_mrktg_lnk3&WT.mc_ev=click

"Obama urged to scrap some Pentagon programs"
By Bryan Bender The Boston Globe
Tuesday, November 11, 2008

[Please see the 5th paragraph + the 3rd from end of the above article.]

And guys and gals, check this out from Shannon at Damon Tucker's Weblog:

"Austal USA [maybe] has won a $1.6 billion contract to build up to 10 high-speed transport ships for the U.S. military, U.S. Sen. Richard Shelby, R-Tuscaloosa, announced Wednesday. Neither Austal nor the U.S. Navy would confirm Wednesday’s announcement..."

"I’m not real good at math… but if my numbers are correct, this would make each one of those ships worth about $160 Million dollars each."

"If Hawaii sold the two Superferries we currently will have to the military for say $150 Million each, then that $300 Million could be put to the losses already incurred as well as pay off any debt..."

Very interesting point, Shannon. The $1.6 Billion seems way too high for the past PEOS budget projections of the JHSV program.

This program is expected to build 1 ship per year, maybe they are figuring on a lot of inflation on the US Dollar to eventually get it up to more than $160 million for each ship later in the program.

But you are correct, Shannon, right now, $160 million is almost twice what each of these first two finished ships cost to build. If some of the difference could be realized between the reported JHSV contract price and what the first two ships (A615 and A616) cost to build, then that could cover all debts and losses, and this whole thing would start to make a lot more sense for the investors, if not the State. Except that at $1.6 Billion for only 10 ships, the Federal Government would be paying almost twice (that's 2 times) what these ships are really worth.

Wonder why the Navy still has not made any announcement on this?

Aloha, Brad

Anonymous said...

From the Superferry Inc's postponement news release - single source for all the media:
"Serving the islands, including the Big Island and Kaua‘i, remains our goal and is very important to us."

You can't cherrypick part of their statement (the postponement) as fact and ignore the rest (Superferry is coming). There's no such thing as a single partially credible source.

MauiBrad said...

Quoting Joan, quoting Kimo, “It obviously is a book against free enterprise and what is constitutional, since it is totally unconstitutional that the superferry was grounded...”

Well, it's running right now, so how could it be "unconstitutional that the superferry was grounded?"

BTW, a book release party is an intellectual gathering. It's not intended to be a protest either for or against. It seems that Kimo should be creating his own protest event somewhere else, and not be hanging onto somebody else's peaceful intellectual gathering.

About returning to Kauai. Fargo has said they will wait until the Act 2 EIS is done. I think Dec. 18th and 19th are going to be big days where the decision from those proceedings will answer this question.

Aloha, Brad

Anonymous said...

Here's key questions for Shannon and Brad:

Why would Austal let a former customer intrude on a contract that: they fought long and hard to obtain, is leveraged on building all 10 ships, and most certainly has legal safeguards to prevent such interference?

What would Austal's stockholders do to the current Board if they failed to maximize their profits from this contract and instead, diverted those moneys to another company's (Superferry) stockholders.

MauiBrad said...

Re: "Why would Austal let a former customer intrude on a contract that: they fought long and hard to obtain, is leveraged on building all 10 ships, and most certainly has legal safeguards to prevent such interference?"

"What would Austal's stockholders do to the current Board if they failed to maximize their profits from this contract and instead, diverted those moneys to another company's (Superferry) stockholders."

First of all, we are assuming Shelby's press release and the dollar figure of $1.6 billion for 10 ships is accurate. The Navy still has not announced that. Also, those ships are budgeted to be built for the next few years at 1 ship per year. The Navy would like to have at least 10 eventually. Regardless of what "the contract" may says, Congress has to approve (or not) these each year. The significance, if the information from Senator Shelby's office is correct, is what the Navy may be willing to pay for a HSV type of ship. Regardless of whether there will be a 'contract' with Austal, the Navy, Army, and Marines have been leasing these types of vessels, and if another company can come in to lease or sell a comparable finished vessel at a price close to or slightly less than what the Navy may be willing to pay on another contract, then what's to say it cannot be done?

Aloha, Brad

Anonymous said...

You really think, with 150-300 million (your numbers) at stake, that the Austal Board and it's legal division would simply say "You go girl?" That's who will say it cannot be done.
Then there is the "process." You just don't casually decide to sell a ship to the Navy for 150-300 million. Even if you could, the other 30+ owners of the same design from Austal, some a good deal faster, might get some competitive ideas.
Oh yeah, there's that military connection that's supposed to explain all the gaps.
This entire speculation is a circular argument.

Anonymous said...

...notice the ferry carbon advantages are never addressed by some people...

...its as hard as getting bush to say "well, no, there were no wmds"

Anonymous said...

There was an article in todays garden Island paper (12-05-08) they stated there were were 15 pro ferry supportors, there were actually 29 at the peak of the event. Kimo Rosen

http://www.kauaiworld.com/articles/2008/12/05/news/kauai_news/doc4938d86eb9bd9567928067.txt