Thursday, December 17, 2009

Musings: Reconsider

It was another perfect winter morning, with quilted pink clouds and mist in the pasture and clear mountain summits and a little nip in the air when Koko and I went walking.

Later, driving into Lihue, I was looking longingly at the glassy, shining waters of Wailua river and bay when I spotted the first of several people along the highway, holding signs that read: “sacred sands,” “keep the path off the beach,” “whose quality of life?” “flawed process” and “shame.”

I waved to them, and they waved back, but it wasn’t the perky, upbeat vibe that accompanies political sign holding. In fact, they looked glum, and I felt like crying.

Surely there’s another solution here. I liked the idea floated in the comments section by “middle way,” who proposed turning the beach front lane of the widened Kuhio Highway into one shared with bicyclists. I don’t see why that wouldn’t work, especially since the speed limit is just 25 mph, as I so well know. And those who didn’t want to be on the road in that section would still have the option of walking their bikes and their bodies along the beach.

I was talking to a friend last night, and he was upset about the situation and wondering why the mayor couldn’t reconsider his original stance, convene a group to review the various options. Because let’s face it, this path has been planned by a small group of people that could hardly be called representative of the community. In fact, that’s one reason why he stopped participating, after asking them: “Where are all the locals?”

This same friend thought it might be good for Bernard to go back to the drawing board on the proposed Kalaheo (Umi) landfill site, too, seeing as how it’s running into so much opposition. As The Garden Island reported today in its coverage of the Council’s review of the Umi site:

“It is becoming apparent that there’s other issues out there that we need to address,” County Engineer Donald Fujimoto told the council.

Yes, just as it’s become apparent other issues need to be addressed with the bike path. But even as the clock is ticking on the Kekaha landfill, and we’re talking here about an essential facility that is used and needed by every single visitor and resident on this island, no one is telling the mayor, who already made his decision on the landfill site, that we've spent enough time and money on this already, soit’s time to “move on.”

As the newspaper also reported:

Tom Shigemoto of A&B testified to register opposition to the proposal and said it might be “prudent” for the county to look elsewhere because unfriendly condemnation will likely be necessary before permitting can even begin.

Hmmm. That throws a small wrench in the works. Seems if the county wanted something from A&B, it should have asked before granting all the Kukuiula approvals. Now what incentive does A&B have to go along? Not that it should. After all, we’re talking about the very first Important Ag Lands to be dedicated on Kauai. What kind of signal are we sending about our support for ag if we build a landfill in the midst of it?

Still, I thought it was very interesting to learn the reason – or at least, the one reported by The Garden Island – for A&B’s opposition:

Kaua‘i Coffee Company, a subsidiary of Alexander and Baldwin, the current landowner of the proposed landfill site, has said putting a 127-acre landfill in the middle of its coffee operation would undermine its image and make it difficult for the company to compete.

OK, so it’s apparently largely an image problem we’re dealing with here. Yet I don’t hear anyone squawking about the intangibility or triviality of that. No one is asking A&B to prove that their image would be harmed, or even that they have a good one or are successfully competing at the moment.

Yet those who have spoken against a path on the beach are challenged to prove that iwi are there and that the beach is sacred.

What it comes down to is, why is it alright to reconsider an essential project because it could harm a company’s image, but it’s not alright to reconsider a non-essential project because of objections raised about sacredness and Hawaiian burials?

And yet one person in comments actually claimed that on Kauai:

We all make concessions to each others' cultural values, but no one group's values are determinative.

Get real! The cultural values associated with materialism always and invariably hold sway.

The friend I was talking to said so many of the comments left on the path and Brescia burial posts bummed him out, because they made him realize just how cold and hard and uncaring so many people are.

That’s one reason why I allow them, just to give folks a sense of what we’re up against. As I told a friend, they’re my little experiment in anarchy, serving as a constant reminder that we’re not anywhere near that level of consciousness yet.

Or as another friend, who lives in the Midwest, observed in an email:

I saw the f the birds and the we hate Hawaiian culture, food, etc comments...... yikes. But, yes, a lot of people think, so what the birds are gone? I am often alarmed how people think, so what the skunk got killed, good riddance, they stink..... we have so little concern for life other than human, but then again, we have little concern for most humans too.

Tis all too true, unfortunately. Still, there are some thoughtful comments among them, left by people who are questioning — and ultimately rejecting — the whole big pile that's being fed to us about the path, proposing other options, counseling compromise, urging cultural respect and environmental consideration. And I'm grateful for those voices, because they remind me and others that despite the attempts to shut us down and up, we've got valid arguments behind us when we say, yes, Mr. Mayor, you need to reconsider.

66 comments:

Punohu's Politics,Environment and Culture said...

Aloha, Joan. As you know the dump is being planned in my community of Kalaheo. We are all against it.

There are some telling technicalities as to why, and they actually have nothing to do with Kauai Coffee Company. When they did the "double blind" study, which was not actually scientificly accurate as a double blind study, they used archaic and out of date numbers. We pointed this out at the first meeting, and they actually admitted we were right.

What these census numbers, from 1999, "200" census shows is that there were very few people in Kalaheo, that Kauai Coffee was not AIL lands, and that there would be no affected aquifiers.

What that did was put Kalaheo on the top of the list.

Now, the county knowing full well what proposals and developments are planned for Kalaheo and Eleele areas know is that these projects are all "Environmental justice " projects which would make the dump project have to come under more stringent Federal Review. (I can explain that later if you like).

So, essentially what the county did, or the contractor did was just plug in numbers that would force the Kalaheo site. We however jumped on that like a pack of rabid dogs. We clearly said that in light of the facts, which are glaringly obvious that they should have waited for the most recent data, ie the 2010 census to do their "study", they agreed that we were right.

However they did not agree to remove Kalaheo from the list. What I discovered during side conversations, where the real issues are discussed is that the County wants to go ahead with the EIS and plug in the real numbers, and then if it proves that Kalaheo falls into the categories of EJ, or IAL they will take it off the list.

We say ridiculous. Stop wasting everyones time. Kauai Coffee is a legitimate business that operates in an environmentally friendly manner, uses no gmos, generates 5 percent of this counties electricity via hydroelectric power, reuses and recycles, and generates its own mulch, gives people good paying jobs that they love. If you know anything about agriculture you must know that this will downplay the validity of the cherry of the coffee considerably. That is just clear science. And consumers that are connossiers of coffee clearly can taste the difference.

How can we say we are environmentalist then be fine with destroying a company that is operating in an environentally frieAloha, APndly way? Ludicrous

We told the administration clearly last night, take Kalaheo off the list (Umi site), and find other alternatives to digging holes in the ground for the next 7 years, or waste the taxpayers time and money trying to condemn an existing business in court.

Aloha, AP

Anonymous said...

"turning the beach front lane of the widened Kuhio Highway into one shared with bicyclists. I don’t see why that wouldn’t work [,its not like its an accident waiting to happen or anything,] especially since the speed limit is just 25 mph [and typical speed just 35-40] "


"why the mayor couldn’t reconsider his original stance"

-- no need. a well informed decision has already been made


"that’s one reason why he stopped participating, after asking them: “Where are all the locals?”

-- wrong and wrong


"The cultural values associated with [reason] always and invariably hold sway"


yes, if it is between further economically burdening the proletariat and some birds with unfortunate navigation systems, then "f the birds" (esp when there are alternative ways to help that particular species not resulting in a 30k/yr family possibly paying double for electricity...reaganomics much?)


darwin_was_pretty_smart

Anonymous said...

Jaon said — and ultimately rejecting — the whole big pile that's being fed to us about the path, proposing other options, counseling compromise, urging cultural respect and environmental consideration. And I'm grateful for those voices, because they remind me and others that despite the attempts to shut us down and up, we've got valid arguments behind us when we say, yes, Mr. Mayor, you need to reconsider.

As usual the oppressed need not only free themselves from oppression, but also bear the burden of freeing their deluded, insensitive, self absorbed, monied special interests oppressors as well!

Talk about the brown person's burden! Lucky we got pono chops that keep on giving our mana'o and resisting these imperialists interlopers. Lucky Gaia (law of nature) is on our side. That's one law they can't repeal. and ignore at humankind's peril. Nobody thought the Vietnamese would prevail but guess what? USA took second place at the Southeast Asian Games. We lose and lose and lose.... and them we win!

I await the standard myopic oppressor response from those that fail to see the connection between a path and the struggle for national liberation.

Ea!

Anonymous said...

we got pono chops that keep on giving our mana'o and resisting these imperialists interlopers.

those that fail to see the connection between a path and the struggle for national liberation.


this path controversy would be happening even if Hawaii was a sovereign country.

Anonymous said...

DWPS said: "some birds with unfortunate navigation systems, then "f the birds"

Unfortunate? It served those little guys well for centuries and is capable of navigating them thousands of miles. Just like a squirrel's tail works to throw off a predator so they can dart up a tree, but never anticipated to terminal velocity of an automobile, the birds never expected false readings created by humans. It is "unfortunate" only in the sense that biology cannot anticipate foolishness, but will respond and then the habits of humans will be "unfortunate" and flatter than road-ready squirrel jerky cooking in the noonday sun.

"unfortunate" Yes we are said to be smarter than little birds, but why slaughter them to prove it?

Anonymous said...

"this path controversy would be happening even if Hawaii was a sovereign country"

I disagree, but am more than willing to find out! Are you? Probably not willing to join the liberation to find out.

Anonymous said...

This comment was posted just today under Tuesday 12/8 Pondering the Path:

"I don't acknowledge pagan volcano gods, nor any other such "deities" of your ilk"

and

"Chiefess Kapi Ľolani effectively killed off Pele in 1824. Pele now resides with Zeus, Apollo, and the rest in the Home for Retired Pagan Deities where she occasionally totters out onto the porch to smoke a cigarette to the delight of a dwindling group of superstitious believers."

How condesending! These self-righteous, know-it-all and holier-than-thou parasite never cease to amaze me with their arrogance. Had their missionaries and god
"killed off Pele" in 1824, Halema`uma`u would be extinct and hundreds of acres of new land would not have been born on the island of Hawai`i. Pele is very much alive today, along with the rest of the original gods of these islands who continue to be worshipped and revered as they were in our ancestors' time.

Your god is your god and that's fine and well. But to deny and mock other belief systems of the Hawaiians, Greeks, or any one else is so telling of your limited head space. That is where the term "HA-OLE" comes from. You are perfect examples of he/she who has no spirit, no breath of positive mana.

No wonder the disconnection and lack of respect for others, the environment and the power of nature.

Anonymous said...

Kook.

Casey said...

You tar many locals when you connect the support for the path to the tragic Brescia case or racist emails and comments.

Anonymous said...

You tar many locals when you connect the support for the path to the tragic Brescia case or racist emails and comments.

Finally a non-anonymous with some common sense!! *applause*

Anonymous said...

"unfortunate" Yes we are said to be smarter than little birds, but why slaughter them to prove it?"

-- sir/ma'am

i'll gladly note i am guessing there is an aspect of their internal navigation system (or optics, as i think about it a bit more) that leads them to collisions etc more so than other species

a fraction of the underground cable money could be diverted (by kiuc) to fund an army of breeders, buy up certain lands, etc which would not jack up costs of living for many that are teetering already (go to the food bank if you want to see / meet who i am talking about). i would hope the feds would find such an alternative acceptable. thank you


...otherwise, as to:

"But to deny and mock other belief systems of the Hawaiians, Greeks, or any one else is so telling of your limited head space."

-- dear friend: seems ur talkin about religion. im pretty sure such a world-class mocking has yet to occur here (though probably a good idea)

but hey, its a free country. throw your lot in with the supernatural. others will go sans ra, jesus, tree goblin, etc. we'll see whats what

oh and there are humans (you know - that little animal with super huge potential but yet commensurate capacity for pain) hurting all around you. feel free to help them (which is probably more important than petting a duck, or teaching voodoo to undereducated kids)


dwps

Anonymous said...

to deny and mock other belief systems of the Hawaiians, Greeks, or any one else is so telling of your limited head space.

Why do I owe ancient Hawaiian and Greek mythology any greater respect than I pay western Christian mythology?

Anonymous said...

How come it was all haoles holding the signs!

Anonymous said...

The coffee already tastes like it has a landfill next door.
Those plants should be up in the hills under vast shade trees.
Any coffee drinker worth his beans knows the best coffee hand picked and grows at the higher elevations.

Anonymous said...

Had their missionaries and god
"killed off Pele" in 1824, Halema`uma`u would be extinct and hundreds of acres of new land would not have been born on the island of Hawai`i.


Of course new land has been created (and continues to be created) over the hot spot that gave (and continues to give) birth to the Hawaiian Islands for millions of years - much longer than humans even existed and so, obviously, before humans created Pele. In short, if humans never existed here to invent Pele, Halema`uma`u would nevertheless not be extinct and hundreds of acres of new land would still have been born on the island of Hawai`i. Even without the myth of Pele.

Anonymous said...

I'm December 17, 2009 7:48 PM and I forgot to sign my name:

Juan Valdez

Punohu's Politics,Environment and Culture said...

I see there are migratory birds even here.

So, let us steer it back to the conversation at hand. The roadway widening, the federal law regarding the birds, the path ect.

One anony, this one said:December 17, 2009 7:43 PM

"how come it was only haoles holding signs.

Um, I was there this afternoon there were Hawaiians, Portuguese, Half-Hawaiians,Hapa Asians, Kama'aina, people related to Hawaiians, parents of Hawaiians, grandparents of Hawaiians Hapa-haoles, Hanai Haoles, and Halau Haumana, (who can be any race, creed or nationality including caucasian.)

In fact, they may be mothers of Hawaiian children, Aunties, Uncles, Nephews, Nieces, Grandmothers and grandfathers of Hawaiians. They could be caregivers of Hawaiians. They could be Haumana(students) of Native Hawaiian Kupuna. They could be just people who love and support Hawaiians.

They could be people that are Kama'aina and agree that it is wrong to disturb iwi kupuna.

There are caucasians you know that do love and support the Hawaiian people for reasons other than what some of you think.

But then how do you know what someones blood quantum is by looking at them? Maybe they are a mixed blood. Maybe they are a white Hawaiian.

Maybe you are a racist, and beleive that no white should be seen taking up the cause of a brown skinned race of people.

Maybe you want to believe that reverse racism serves a purpose. Maybe you are just ignorant.

There are a thousand "maybe"s, to why a caucasian person would hold a sign in favor of supporting a Native Hawaiian Concern.

But as I have said many times,
"Those who know require no explanation. To those who don't no explanation is ever sufficient."

Punohu's Politics,Environment and Culture said...

December 17, 2009 7:01 PM (anony)

In answer to this comment, it is really quite simple.

Unlike the worship of Ancient Greek Gods, The Hawaiian Pantheon is still alive, and well, and actively worshipped and is a current, living religion.

The same as Christianity, Judaism, Hinduism, Budhism.

Therefore, it is just plain rude to say that the sacred Goddess, Pele "farts are smelly", as one of these posters did on the other blog.

Let us set the record correct. Yes, there were decsecrations of the temples instigated by the Ali'i nui. In fact, a woman overturned the kapu system. But not because she hated the gods, because she hated the kapu that Kamehameha had instituted after it had long not been in effect.

It was then, just a short while later that the first missionaries happened along and the rest is history.

For more on this, please read "Tales of the Night Rainbow", by Jae Pai Lee, and the recollections of her great, great grandmother who died at the age of 119 in Maui. She recalls her grandmother and grandfathers story of actually living in that time and there experiences continuing on the old ways and religion, including the hula under the new kapu of "no pagan religions"

Educate yourself. On the outer islands nothing ever really died and everything was continued in secret.

Highly offensive doesn't even begin to cut it, and for once the words ho'o hewa nui no, and ho'o pilau nui no don't even go far enough to describe the filth of that statement.

AS I have said many times before, and I will continue to say it I dare each and every one of you who make such statements repeat them in real life with Native Hawaiians present, if you are proud enough to announce them on a blog of this high caliber, then you should be proud enough to announce them to all you encounter during your busy and eventful days here in the birthplace of the Hawaiian people.

EO EO EO

Joan Conrow said...

Casey, I never did "connect the support for the path to the tragic Brescia case or racist emails and comments." I said a friend was bummed out by some of the comments left on the path and Brescia posts.

As for DWPS, there's nothing wrong with the Newell's optics or navigation systems and they don't collide more than other species. Millions of birds are killed each year in the US because of collisions with utility lines and cell phone towers. On Kauai, the bright coastal lights and maze of utility lines are a very new occurrence, and the birds have not had time to evolve in response to these new threats, especially since they spend most of their lives at sea. And if they continue to be killed off at the rate they are, they'll be extinct before they can adapt.

As for "funding an army of breeders," you are really showing your ignorance. These aren't chickens you can pick up at the feed store. We don't even know how to captive propagate these birds, or the details of their life history. Further, all successful captive prop. programs are built around the concept of minimizing habitat threats, not just throwing out more birds to be killed. As for buying land, most of the Newell's colonies are on state land. Yes, more could be done to reduce predation by rats and cats. But the most effective way to prevent the decline of an endangered species is to stop killing it.

Your supposed concern for the "proletariat" is certainly not borne out by comments you've left elsewhere, and even in discussing them, you got it wrong. They do not hang out at the food bank, because the food bank does not directly distribute food to individuals, but to agencies.

Yes, Darwin probably was pretty smart, but you, apparently, not so much.

Anonymous said...

South Park had an episode on which Jesus crapped turds on George Bush. It was hilarious! And I voted for George Bush!

Anonymous said...

looks like DWPS stepped in sacred cow poop.

Anonymous said...

k so ALL species of birds on kauai are equally being killed by lights, wires etc? seems doubtful but if thats the facts then so be it

RE:

As for "funding an army of breeders," you are really showing your ignorance.

lets be real - im about half the age of most posting here, and still seem to have a better grasp of the world (but the quality of commentary here is regularly frighteningly awful, so no big achievement there). anyways, as to birds - a variety of species (the condor comes to mind at the moment) have done well under captive breeding, including especially small and difficult to rear tropical birds on the big island. so im way out of line suggesting same for this particular bird? highly doubt it. but hey - if for reasons ABC such is not technically possible for this particular animal, then sure, that is a huge factor


"Your supposed concern for the "proletariat" is certainly not borne out by comments you've left elsewhere"

-- like hell its not. i could dig out prob 50 examples posted on this blog in the past (but hey - lots of comments are posted, and nobody has a perfect memory. understood)


"and even in discussing them, you got it wrong. They do not hang out at the food bank, because the food bank does not directly distribute food to individuals"

-- for sure i used the term "food bank" generally. im happy to offer a more specific example: hanapepe sal army. religious org? yes. but are they effective and do good and needed work? yes. have i funded with thousands of my own dollars some of their operations? yes

anyways, the notion that those partaking in "free food" (from food banks or like venues) are economically strapped should not be too hard to grasp, on most blogs anyways



"Juan Valdez

December 17, 2009 7:53 PM"

-- nice one :)


dwps


ps - monk seals are delicious

Punohu's Politics,Environment and Culture said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Anonymous said...

I suppose Pele's shit doesn't stink either.

Stupid pagans...past and present.

Anonymous said...

Well, lots of that rope lava does look like a pile of shit...

Punohu's Politics,Environment and Culture said...

(I had to quote these two anony posts, becasue appearently they are twins and posted at exactly the same time, so there is nothing to distinguish them from each other.)

"Anonymous said...

I suppose Pele's shit doesn't stink either.

Stupid pagans...past and present.

December 17, 2009 11:13 PM
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Well, lots of that rope lava does look like a pile of shit...

December 17, 2009 11:13 PM"

Dear "Children of the Blogs", get a grip before Joan just starts removing your offensive comments, and then you won't get to play with the adults in here anymore.

I believe there is an age limit to posting here. Something like 14 or so. Your comments show you to be possibly maybe 5 or 6 if that. Also, your parents should wash your mouths out with soap. Your potty mouth is disgusting.

If you want to play with the adults then you have to act like one. Otherwise, Auntie Joan will probably have to put you in a very very long time out.

Anonymous said...

I think "Auntie Joan" likes the quite justified verbal abuse you attract like a magnet.

No one else here attracts the attention you do....must be you then.

Not since that other wacko, "nunce" or something.


Comic relief.

Joan Conrow said...

No, I don't like abuse or inanity, so let's up the quality of discourse here.

Anonymous said...

"We all make concessions to each others' cultural values, but no one group's values are determinative."

Get real! The cultural values associated with materialism always and invariably hold sway.


That's demonstrably false. For instance we, the people of Hawaii, paid $6 million so that a resort development would not be built atop iwi and to restore the burial ground and move the resort further inland.

I understand that to someone like yourself who reflexively hates all development and especially fancy, posh resort developments and who harbors a holier than thou attitude towards what you view as materialist, consumerist culture, that looks like no compromise at all, because the resort still got built.

But objectively, there of course was compromise. Concessions were made respecting cultural values. So you are mistaken. The statement is correct. We all make concessions to each others' cultural values, but no one group's values are determinative.

Punohu's Politics,Environment and Culture said...

OK lets get something clear. I am not now nor have ever been against the bike path. I testified numerous times at county council meetings especially about my support for the path.

However, my idea of a path and the county's idea of a path was far different. When I began to see the writing on the wall, and I saw the alignments, and I realized that the path would not be feeding into the more "local", or dare i say it "poorer" neighborhoods of our island, that the bus would not effectively connect to it, that there were no transportation options to take a bike on a public transport and connect to make communting on the path reasonable, (only 2 bikes can go on a bus at once, and the buses run about every hour, 2 hours on Saturday and they don't run on Sunday when people might most want to use the path), when I realized it would do very little to relieve traffic, when I saw the ugly interpretive signs, when I saw the landscaping and realized it was for tourists, when I realized that it was far away from where I live so did nothing to service three quarters of the island residents here, but would be convenient for most of the tourists and wealthy I began to have serious doubts.

I still want a bycicle walking path on this island that is in neighborhoods, that connects, that is linked up to the county transport system which should have shuttles especially for bike path commuters with more bike racks, ect. There should be no contrived landscaping, tasteful signage when needed and it should not look like a darn freeway and impede on the precious beach. We have little enough room as it is.

But the number one thing no path or bicycle path can do is impede on sensitive cultural and sacred areas period. Now, the argument can be made, we want the Kupuna to be able to access these areas and be ADA compliant. Nothing wrong with that, and I agree.

However to encourage everyone to impact these sites, and to commit the sacrilege of drilling into the sands to 13 feet to anchor some boardwalk down that is just going to get torn up anyways I find that is not what I want. I an a citizen of this island, and I have every right to demand that this bike path adhere to what I want. Not what the visitors want. It is not their island. Ir is our island. I will not support a bike path or a walking path that is only being built for the attraction, and comfort of those who are wealthy newcomers and tourists. I do not need my beaches interpreted for me ad nauseum every 500 feet with a huge obnoxous Disneyland type sign.

A'ole.

Now I say get it right. Or I think the Federal Highway Commission may have something to say about missappropriations of funds. If you claim the bikepath is for one purpose, and then clearly show it is not yet use the funding anyways that, my friends is something we can all right our congressional representatives about.

Punohu's Politics,Environment and Culture said...

And don't even think about making comments about the whole "I must hate tourism thing."

I have been involved in tourism since I was 12. I was entertaining at a luau at that age. I have worked in tourism on and off for 35 years. Don't tell me I hate tourism. I have met wonderful tourists, and admire them.

But the machine of tourism has done absolutely nothing to better the standard of living for our people. We are a mono- economic society always have been we need to diversify our economy and I have been saying this since 1998.

SO don't go there.

Anonymous said...

OMFG

AlohaJo said...

Punohu Politics, Environment and Culture: Are you Hawaiian? I don't think you are. You seem to feel that you are an authority of sorts. And some of the stuff on here is just crap. Please, don't "enlighten" us further. Just go back to your own blog.

Dawson said...

But the machine of tourism has done absolutely nothing to better the standard of living for our people. We are a mono- economic society always have been we need to diversify our economy and I have been saying this since 1998.


Bingo. And since one good quote deserves another:


"Tourism is a devil's bargain, not only in the twentieth-century American West but throughout the nation and the world. Despite its reputation as a panacea for the economic ills of places that have lost their way in the postindustrial world or for those that never found it, tourism typically fails to meet the expectations of communities and regions that embrace it as an economic strategy. Regions, communities, and locales welcome tourism as an economic boon, only to find that it irrevocably changes them in unanticipated and uncontrollable ways. From this one enormous devil's bargain flows an entire collection of closely related conditions that complement the process of change in overt and subtle ways. Tourism transforms culture into something new and foreign....

"As a viable option for moribund or declining places, tourism promises much but delivers only a little, often in forms different from what its advocates anticipate. Its local beneficiaries come from a small segment of the population, 'the growth coalition,' the landowners, developers, planners, builders, real estate sales and management interests, bankers, brokers and others. The capital that sustains these interests comes from elsewhere, changing local relationships and the values that underpin them and their vision of place. Other residents flounder, finding their land their greatest asset and their labor lightly valued. With tourism comes unanticipated and irreversible consequences, social, cultural, economic, demographic, environmental, and political consequences that communities, their leaders, and their residents typically face unprepared.

"The embrace of tourism triggers a contest for the soul of a place....

"...Tourism is the most colonial of colonial economies, not because of the sheer physical difficulty or the pain or humiliation intrinsic in its labor but because of its psychic and social impact on people and their places."

- Rothman, 1998. Devil's Bargains: Tourism in the Twentieth-Century American West.

Punohu's Politics,Environment and Culture said...

Dear AlohaJoe

If you want to know about my history and background, and what my blood is, you are welcome to go to my blog and read my extensive bio there.

Here is not the place .

Further, before you know who or what someone is you should be careful about making assumptions.

I put my picture up so you can clearly see who and what I am.
I don't hide anything from anyone.

To answer your question though, I am a mixed blood half white person of indigenous native blood.

My mother was pure Irish.

On a better note:

To Dawson:

*standing ovation for that posting*

Ralph said...

Irony! Here's from a Publishers Weekly review of Rothman, 1998, Devil's Bargains: Tourism in the Twentieth-Century American West.

The West derives much of its appeal as a tourist attraction, Rothman explains, from its place in the American cultural imagination as a kind of exotic elsewhere, a refuge from the postindustrial urban world. Such perceptions pressure Western communities to stay frozen in time, he maintains, and play up their quaintness.

But that's exactly the desire of the anti-tourist, anti-development, anti-capitalist faction on Kauai! A frozen-in-time refuge from the postindustrial urban world. Hm. Maybe their ideal for the island isn't so benign after all. Perhaps what they wish for is their own personal quaint refuge from postindustrial urbanization but they don't want to share that refuge with other tourists.

Punohu's Politics,Environment and Culture said...

In regards to Ralphs post, which was rather thoughtful and cerebral, and at least He has a name...

The issue for me is not that I don't want tourists coming here, but that the only validity seen for us is that of tourism.

On the issue of the path that becomes abundantly clear.

Who is the path for? Us, then, or all of us together enjoying a neutral ground, where we are not put in the subservient role of "hosting" the tourists, and we can just let our hair down and be ourselves, rather than putting on our "the tourists are here" mask of professionalism.

For me, I want to walk a path that I feel is in my neighborhood, and is comfortable for me. After all I live here, it is my home.

Let us look at a simple analogy.

You are having houseguests. You of course want to make the house look nice. SO you wash the floors, make everything nice and neat and clean.

But you don't paint your house a different color, or change all the draperies to another pattern you think your guests might like, but you yourself would hate. Nor do you go and rush out and buy all new furniture in a color and style you detest, but they would appreciate more.

It is the same with the path.

Just something to ponder.

And another note to AlohaJoe:

No one here is claiming to be an expert on anything. I am giving my opinions, observations and sharing knowledge that I have been given, taught or personally experienced.

No one is an expert on anything anymore. Even you.

Anonymous said...

Anne, if you think the path is only for the tourists then you obviously don't walk on it. Go walk on it. You will probably run into lots of people that you know. Lots and lots of locals on there. Don't get fooled that landscaping means only for tourists. Even towns with no tourism in other states landscape their park and etc just to make it look good. Okay you think it doesn't look good. But that doesn't mean it is only for tourists. It is for all of us. Go enjoy it.

Anonymous said...

AP - you don't sit back and watch.


We wish you would, sit back and read instead of inserting your opinions and believes of what is and is not Hawaiian culture in your perception.

Anonymous said...

Maybe it time to landscape more with native plants like Lau Hala. Not only good looking but provides a raw material for the weavers on island.

Dawson said...

But that's exactly the desire of the anti-tourist, anti-development, anti-capitalist faction on Kauai! A frozen-in-time refuge from the postindustrial urban world. Hm. Maybe their ideal for the island isn't so benign after all. Perhaps what they wish for is their own personal quaint refuge from postindustrial urbanization but they don't want to share that refuge with other tourists.

Rothman's book is 434 pages, thoroughly researched and heavily footnoted. Meaning no disrespect to your post, studying Rothman will show you how off-target your characterization of "anti-tourist, anti-development, anti-capitalist" is.

The desire to keep a touristed place a frozen-in-time refuge for themselves is, as Rothman demonstrates, that part of tourism that has turned colonial occupier.

The desire of those born to the culture of a place that then has become touristed, to reject the colonial aspects of touristification, is something quite different.

Punohu's Politics,Environment and Culture said...

December 18, 2009 10:54 AM anonymous

I agree with what you are saying here.

However, although I used to be able to enjoy the path at Lydgate which I used to walk regularly and I never had any complaints about, I am in Kalaheo now and it is just simply inconvenient for most Southsiders or Westsiders to use or benefit from the path.

I agree that locals will use the path. But will they, like many other places of our island get shut out by visitors, and biking tours on the path?

What about racial profiling? Do you remember the case of the local guy and his dog that was being complained about by someone from the mainland, a new resident here, or a snowbird, I forget which. That was a path incident when it was newly opened on the Kealia side of it.

Remember when everyone started using that path that they had to make at Kealia Kai because we fought so hard for it? Do you remember how their security used to follow everyone down on either side, and racially profile what people were doing down there?

We are just using a minute area of the path right now. Did you see the signage they wanted to put up? Do we need that? My eyes would get sore from looking at that.

On another note:

Yes, Lauhala is a wonderful material. I myself work with Lauhala and weave it, although I can only make simple things with it such as the Kauai style woven bracelets. For real lauhala weaving, you should visit the Kaua'i Museum and look at those incredible papale in there. WOW. Now that is skill. And all of that leaf, as I recall was from here on Kaua'i.

I think it would be great to have lauhala planted on the path. However, it would need to be harvested regularly and cleaned up as well.

Lauhala occurs naturally all through Kapa'a corridor, although to be used it must be the male leaf only. There are several very good trees beside Hikina A Ka La that have excellent male leaf, as well as across the new bridge by the library side. I have used leaf from both of these areas.

Laua'e would also be nice, as well as popolo which occurs naturally in the area, and of course melia (plumeria) is also wonderful. But it is not indigenous. These plants would be wonderful along the path. Just not in such a contrived way. Make it look natural. After all the path should be shaded.

Of course we have to think of the path as concrete, then the root systems might break up the surface of the path so that has to be thought of.

I am not against their being plantings along the bikepath. I am not against a bike path. I know locals will use it, are using it and will use it in the future.

I just want to make sure that it fits in with the natural environment and is for the community of Kauai, That means everyone and not being targeted for a group of people who are not permanent residents here. As I said in my past analogy we don't change the furniture when guests come to visit.

But I did like your post, as well as December 18, 2009 11:03 AM anonymous post about the lauhala.

Punohu's Politics,Environment and Culture said...

awesome post, Dawson, I like that. REferences are so helpful!
Mahalo

Ralph said...

Oh, I'm not necessarily talking about those "born to the culture of a place that then has become touristed." I'm talking about the "anti-tourist, anti-development, anti-capitalist"s who have moved here over the decades, and have done exactly what is described: tried to keep it frozen in time as a refuge for themselves from the postindustrial urbanization they are using Kauai to escape from. Yes, it is colonialization. And whether they like or can handle the truth of it or not, they are colonizers.

Ralph said...

And while some born here locals of Hawaiian descent would like things to remain frozen in time, many, probably most, do not.

Dawson said...

I'm talking about the "anti-tourist, anti-development, anti-capitalist"s who have moved here over the decades, and have done exactly what is described: tried to keep it frozen in time as a refuge for themselves from the postindustrial urbanization they are using Kauai to escape from. Yes, it is colonialization. And whether they like or can handle the truth of it or not, they are colonizers.

My apologies, Ralph -- I misunderstood your previous post.

Anonymous said...

Joan said Yes, Darwin probably was pretty smart, but you, apparently, not so much.

Nice ending to a very thoughtful reply.

Anonymous said...

December 18, 2009 8:02 AM is only prolonged by your own personal dislike of the bike path.
and watch.


Its not a "bike" path. Don't make me correct you again! Try be accurate in your characterizations.

Punohu's Politics,Environment and Culture said...

December 18, 2009 12:29 PM
You know I have to say you are correct on this. It is supposed to be a multiuse path. One that is to be shared with people for different purposes. Wheelchairs, strollers, bicyclists, walkers and people with pets.

This was one of the concerns we had in the beginning when some of us testified in favor of the bike path. We were concerned about collisions between bicyclists that were cruising at a slow speed, speedy bicyclers that were commuting this going at a pretty good clip, wheelchairs which could be either motorized or non motorized. Many amputees use a leaned in wheeled type of wheelchair to strengthen their arms, since upper body strength is important for them to keep developed. We were concerned between children scared of dogs, walkers, ect all on one little path.

Then the path was widened to 15 feet, and laned and marked kind of like a freeway, and in some areas will also share the road with vehicles such as from shell station to the Coconut Grove area.

When I gave my testimony on this, I had always envisioned the path to be more of a floating concrete smooth path for bikes, wheelchairs and moms and dads with strollers that would be the slow lane, and a fast lane for commuters.

I always hoped there would be a soft, smooth dirt path for walkers, joggers, and pet walkers. I had always thought this made much more sense then crowding everyone onto one path.

I had also hoped too, in some sections of the path that horse trails would also be allowed. I felt there was room for them, and since we had always ridden horses, down at the beach before and on the roadways I had thought this could have been incorporated. I had always advocated a mix of soft trails, and hardened floating trails.

But like I have stated before keep it natural, and run the path to all of the feeder neighborhoods, and around the whole of the island, and ensure that the bus connects, runs more often, on Saturdays and runs on Sundays to really make the path work for everyone.

Punohu's Politics,Environment and Culture said...

December 18, 2009 10:54 AM
anonymous

It is never Hawaiian Culture to disturb the iwi, period. I will never advocate that or agree to that.
I will not debate that point further.
I express the culture as it was taught to and lived by me, personally.
Not bending on that one either.
What is happening is there is a clear clash between the noble notion of a multi use path, and the fact that is about to go through a place of cultural sacredness, burial grounds, and must change its alignment or insult a whole lot of people, both Hawaiian and non-Hawaiian alike who would very much like to use the path but not at the expense of desecrating the iwi kupuna.

I had a conversation today at breakfast with a special friend of mine, and it was suggested that an ultrasound be done of the beach, before any digging is done to confirm the presence of iwi without disturbing the sand.

I thought this was a great idea.

Dawson said...

lets be real - im about half the age of most posting here, and still seem to have a better grasp of the world...

*nostalgic sigh* ...I remember when I was young and brilliant. Sweet times, those days of high-contrast certitude.

May you and your world-girding intellect age gracefully.

Anonymous said...

"*nostalgic sigh* ...I remember when I was young and brilliant. Sweet times, those days of high-contrast certitude.

May you and your world-girding intellect age gracefully."


-- i would respond but am afraid your mom would delete it ;)


dwps

Anonymous said...

I'm kind of floored that Dawson is accusing anyone else of "high-contrast certitude"

Anonymous said...

I'm tired of hearing about how this kind of PROGRESS aka development is only propogated and imposed on the Hawaiians.

http://www.nnygenealogy.com/pages/cemetery/trinity.html

Development/urban renewal PROGRESS happens - be a part of the solution instead of continuing to be a source of only headaches and problem producing arrogant self righteous, better than thou 'sts.

Anonymous said...

Wow, Anne Punohu, you sure do post a lot on this blog, and long ones, too. Not that there's anything wrong with that.

Anonymous said...

'it was suggested that an ultrasound be done of the beach, before any digging'

however unless the science has improved the ground penatrating radar

not as accurate as you would hope

http://mysite.du.edu/~lconyer/hawaiian_gpr_studies.htm

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6VFC-47PCNTN-R&_user=10&_rdoc=1&_fmt=&_orig=search&_sort=d&_docanchor=&view=c&_searchStrId=1141144294&_rerunOrigin=google&_acct=C000050221&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=10&md5=c66ee5706c572e9c6170847b562ab986

they actually found bones here and STILL built after much controversy.

http://www.abc.net.au/stateline/act/content/2004/s1151456.htm

get over it.

Punohu's Politics,Environment and Culture said...

Hmm thanks for those links, I will be looking those over carefully when I get time. Even though you said "get over it", after being so helpful, you still gave me valuable information.

Don't you find that?...ironic?

Oh oh, i feel a saying coming on!

"Sarcasm is the wine of Irony"

Anonymous said...

AP

presumptious to believe that the 'get over it' poster was speaking to you.

Punohu's Politics,Environment and Culture said...

My post:"I had a conversation today at breakfast with a special friend of mine, and it was suggested that an ultrasound be done of the beach, before any digging is done to confirm the presence of iwi without disturbing the sand."

THe anony post YOU are referring to:

Anonymous said...

'it was suggested that an ultrasound be done of the beach, before any digging'

however unless the science has improved the ground penatrating radar

not as accurate as you would hope"...with the "get over it" comment at the end.

Hmm, sure sounds like it was either being adressed to me, or perhaps it was...Minnie Mouse.

Well, I certainly am presumptuous aren't I? Shame on me.

Your post was a non issue.

If people are going to post as anonymous, they need to state who their post is to, then, don't they?

I think YOU are the presumptuous one, presuming the post was NOT to me.

"The battlefields of idiots are the playgrounds of geniuses."

Just so you know, this post is to you.

Anonymous said...

"be a source of only headaches and problem producing arrogant"

This is not crowdsourcing, this is opinionist heaven.

Anonymous said...

`A`o and Ilio-holo-i-ka-uaua say:

f all the young white atheist males with mainland mentalities and darwin fixations.

Anonymous said...

"f all the young white atheist males with mainland mentalities and darwin fixations."

-- seasons greetings and mekaleka hi meka hihgnee ho to you as well :)


dwps/mm

Anonymous said...

"mekaleka hi meka hihgnee ho"

what's that? a culturally insensitive attempt at humor?

Anonymous said...

reciprocity


dwps

Anne P said...

I think it may have been Swahili. But very bad grammatical form

There is no way anyone could have mixed up that jumble of consonants for 'olelo.

Pee Wee said...

"mekaleka hi meka hihgnee ho"

what's that? a culturally insensitive attempt at humor?


You obviously never watched Pee Wee's Playhouse.